"First they ignore you, then they ridicule you, then they fight you, then you win." -- Mahatma Gandhi

Can We Have a National Conversation on the Definition of Torture?

April 27th, 2009 by MarkTwain · No Comments

Remember when this was considered real torture?

Remember the old playground saying, “Sticks and stones may break my bones but words will never hurt me?” With the prevalence of the cancer of political correctness in our society, words have lost all of their meaning, and we’re afraid that in this case, it may result in terrorist attacks on our country. The definition of torture is so watered down now, that anything done to a prisoner that is remotely uncomfortable to them is torturing them.

According to the ACLU and the Democrats, water boarding – under strict conditions and under the watchful eye of an attending physician – is now considered on par with above pictured Al Qaida torture pamphlet. The Democrats are playing a dangerous game pushing for investigations into who within the Bush Administration authorized “enhance interrogation techniques.” Once the documents are released showing thwarted terrorist attacks, most sane Americans will condone subjecting the killers of innocents to simulated drowning to get information.

Below is an appearance by Kit Bond and Sen. Levin from Michigan debating torture on Fox News Sunday. It’s sad to see Sen. Levin risk all our lives for divisive partisan witch hunt

 

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Tags: Senator. Kit Bond

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  • 1 Paul Ground // Apr 28, 2009 at 10:59 pm

    Sadly, it’s unlikely that we can have a meaningful discussion of the definition of torture. There are at least a couple of reasons for this. First, the positions of all sides are so hardened that neither is likely to concede a millimeter to achieve a mutual understanding. Secondly, the in Modern American Liberal view, torture might consist of anything from failing to affirm one’s importance by getting an F on a report card to subjecting another human to second-hand smoke. Against such a backdrop, no meaningful discussion can be achieved. This is unfortunate because it mediates against formulation of good policy, or even reaching a point where we understand fundamental rational underpinnings of what might become policy.

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